Month of Print

Baillieu Library: July - September 2011

One day print symposium 2nd September 2011, Baillieu Library, University of Melbourne

The Baillieu Library Print Collection includes some 8,000 prints – mostly etchings, engravings, mezzotints, lithographs, woodcuts and wood engravings – that date from the fifteenth century to the twentieth.  It is based on the gift of some 3,700 Old Master prints donated by Dr J. Orde Poynton in 1959 and which was further enhanced in 1964 with Harold Wright’s gift of half his Lionel Lindsay print collection and prints by his British contemporaries.

The collection is principally for teaching and learning; a number of scholars had their first encounter with prints at the Baillieu Library and later emerged in print related institutions and projects such as those offered by the Harold Wright Scholarship and the Sarah & William Holmes Scholarship.  This symposium looks at the Baillieu Library Print Collection’s influence, research which has evolved from using the collection, and particular learning outcomes.
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Print matters at the Baillieu Write of Fancy: The Golden Cockerel Press

An exhibition in the Leigh Scott Gallery, Baillieu Library, University of Melbourne July to September 2011

This exhibition explores the hearts and minds of the inventors, writers and artists of this English press which operated between 1920 and 1960. It showcases examples from the Baillieu Library’s exceptional collection of Golden Cockerel books, comprising the gifts of various individual donors and the Friends of the Baillieu Library. Examples included  are Eric Gill and Robert Gibbings’ collaboration on The four Gospels (1931), John Buckland Wright’s illustration of Endymion (1947), and maritime history books.

Golden Cockerel books achieved a visual harmony between content, typography and illustration. The exhibition is a chance to discover how this private press from its inception was a flight of fancy, and how through its words and images it became a ‘write of fancy.’

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